Changed By Music, LLC
"The brain that engages in music is changed by engaging in music." Dr. Michael Thaut, PhD.
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Changed By Music Video Clips (posted with permission)

Brock is 4 years old and diagnosed with Childhood Apraxia of Speech. This video focuses on his articulation of "th" (as in "teeth") and includes footage of his pronunciation at the beginning and end of the process (clips seen span from 5/5/ 2011 to 7/25/2011 though change was apparent immediately). The NMT method used in this clip is called Rhythmic Speech Cueing (or RSC), which uses a rhythmic pulse to provide structure to better sequence the motor planning for speech.





This is the same client seen in the previous video. Brock is 4 years old and diagnosed with Childhood Apraxia of Speech. We are working on improving motor planning in sequencing multiple-syllable words, and in this video you will see this process with the word "hospital" (clips seen span from 8/4/2011 to 8/17/ 2011). The same technique is used in this example as the video above. Rhythmic Speech Cueing (RSC) uses a rhythmic pulse that provides structure to better sequence the motor planning for speech. Brock now demonstrates the correct motor planning in saying this word accurately on a consistent basis.





McKenna is 5 years old and diagnosed with Childhood Apraxia of Speech. In this video, we are working on improving sound initiation, as she would often leave off the beginning sounds of words. The NMT method used in this video is Developmental Speech and Language training through Music (DSLM). Rhythm and a simple melody provide a predictable structure that helps the brain anticipate and prepare itself to produce the motor planning for production of the initial sound. This clip demonstrates how rhythm can be used to cue the initiation of the beginning sounds of words. Hand cues are part of the Speech-EZ Apraxia Program.





Bella is diagnosed with Prader-Willi Syndrome and was around a year old when these video clips were recorded. When I first started working with her, Bella's arms and upper body remained very tight and she did not demonstrate any arm extension. Through an NMT intervention called Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP), Bella was highly motivated to reach for chimes and other instruments with the additional support of rhythm and a simple melody. She now independently uses her arms to reach for everything!





Ridge is 6 years old and diagnosed with Williams Syndrome. One major goal is increasing attention control. Through an intervention called Musical Attention Control Training (MACT), musical and rhythmic elements are used to help train attention in the brain. In this example, he is following a specific auditory cue (change in pitch and tempo of tone bar) in order to complete an action (toss the ball).

At the very end, the therapist also takes away all visual input by holding a folder in front of the bars so they cannot be seen. This would be the next step in the exercise, to take away all visual input for complete reliance on auditory input. This client continues to show improvement in his ability to attend to tasks through completion.





This client is the same as seen in the previous video. Ridge is 6 years old and diagnosed with William Syndrome. This is another Musical Attention Control Training (MACT) exercise focusing on attention. The research and evidence-based concepts behind MACT provide a guideline, and the therapist is then free to construct different interventions within this guideline.

In this example, he is again following auditory cues to perform specific actions with his body. He listens to the different ways the guitar is played and associates that with a movement, such as shaking, jumping, stopping, etc. Changes in the harmony help add brief anticipation before stopping his body, helping to prepare the brain and body to completely stop when the music stops.